Stations

Project objectives

The Yanchep Rail Extension will:

  • provide a new transport choice to Perth’s growing northern corridor with improved public transport travel times;
  • provide alternative, sustainable transport options, as shared paths connect the stations to surrounding residential and employment areas; and
  • help meet Perth’s long term population growth strategy by creating new communities with a mix of uses around Yanchep, Eglinton and Alkimos stations.

Rail Alignment

The majority of the 14.5 km long rail extension will be built in a cutting to support community connections and integration, reduce noise and visual impacts and improve the overall amenity.

The Yanchep Rail Extension will deliver nine road-over-rail bridges, which will also support access and the early staging of development around the stations.

A potential additional 11 crossings are identified along the route as part of longer-term development intentions. These have been future proofed in the design, but are subject to further planning and delivery by third parties.

 

Butler Station

The existing Butler Station will experience minimal impacts as part of the Yanchep Rail Extension.

The Butler Station will change from an end-of-the-line station, and become a through station enabling trains to travel north or south on the Joondalup Line.

Work at Butler Station will include extending the existing platform, and connecting the new and existing train tracks. Any short-term disruptions to the station’s operations will be comprehensively communicated in advance.

Alkimos Station

Approximately 41-minutes from Perth by train, Alkimos Station will serve the future city-scale Alkimos Central development, which has been master planned by DevelopmentWA to provide much needed key service amenities to the area.

Located on the corner of Romeo Road and Marmion Avenue, west of Wanneroo Road, the station will have a  ground-level concourse and station building, with two platforms located in a cutting and connections to both sides of the development.

The universally accessible station will have:

  • passenger amenity: public toilets, public services (such as vending machines), kiosk, passenger ticketing/information, staff amenities, station administration offices, storage/cleaning and operational facilities;
  • pedestrian/cycle access: connected to shared path, with two secure bicycle parking shelters, bike u-rails and ability to add additional secure bicycle parking shelters in the future;
  • bus interchange: six-stands with weather protection, seating and information facilities. The interchange includes four layover bays; and
  • vehicle access: dedicated passenger drop-off area and approximately 600 parking bays.

Read the Alkimos Station fact sheet (PDF) for more information. Visit DevelopmentWA’s Alkimos Central for more information about the future precinct development.

Station architecture

Local landmarks and early investigations conducted with METRONET’S Noongar Reference Group to identify important local Noongar themes, such as the limestone pinnacles and Melaleuca huegelii, has influenced Alkimos Station’s architecture.

Melaleucas are often referred to as ‘Teatree’ or ‘Paperbark’ trees. Melaleuca huegelii was extremely important to Noongar people due to its versatility – large pieces could provide coverage for shelters, smaller pieces were used to carry water and wrap food, and the leaves could be crushed for the medicinal properties of the aromatic oil, which could be brewed as a healing tea. It is also a well-known native species familiar to most Western Australians, and often planted in local parks or on verges.

Station Renders

Alkimos External WEB 

Alkimos Internal WEB

*these images are artists impressions only and subject to change. 

 

Eglinton Station

Approximately 46-minutes from Perth by train, Eglinton Station will be built south of Pipidinny Road, east of Marmion Avenue and west of Wanneroo Road, and is designed to support a localised community.

Accessed via a station building at ground-level, the two platforms will be located in a cutting with at least 50 per cent coverage. The universally accessible station will have:

  • passenger amenity: public services (such as vending machines), passenger ticketing/information, storage/cleaning and operational facilities;
  • pedestrian/cycle access: connected to a shared path, with two secure bicycle parking shelters, bike u-rails and ability to add additional secure bicycle parking shelters in the future;
  • bus interchange: eight-stands with weather protection, seating and information facilities. The interchange includes four layover bays; and
  • vehicle access: dedicated passenger drop-off area and approximately 400 parking bays. As future demand increases, the parking can expand up to approximately 1,000 bays.

Read the Eglinton Station fact sheet (PDF) for more information.  

Station architecture 

Early investigations conducted with METRONET’s Noongar Reference Group to identify important local flora species, such as Eucalyptus Globulus woodlands and Grevillea Preissii, has influenced Eglinton Station’s architecture.

Noongar people often called flowering shrubs, such as grevilleas, Berrung. Grevillea nectar was an important source of sweetness in Noongar food. Nectar could be sucked directly from the flowers themselves, or sweet drinks could be made by soaking the flowers in water. Grevillea Preissii is widely used in landscaping today for its low water requirements and bird-attracting qualities.

Eglinton External WEB

*These images are artists impressions only and subject to change. 

Yanchep Station

Approximately 49-minutes from Perth by train, Yanchep Station will become the heart of Perth’s newest strategic business centre.

The end-of-the-line station will be located south of the future Toreopango Avenue, north of Yanchep Beach Road, east of Marmion Avenue and west of Wanneroo Road.

Built in a cutting, with a cut and cover approach to provide ground-level connections in a concourse area to each side of the railway, Yanchep Station’s future-proof design provides land development opportunities, while meeting passenger needs from day one of operations.   

The universally accessible station will have:

  • passenger amenity: public toilets, public services (such as vending machines), kiosk, passenger ticketing/information, staff amenities, station administration offices, storage/cleaning and operational facilities;
  • pedestrian/cycle access: connected to a shared path, with two secure bicycle parking shelters, bike u-rails and ability to add additional secure bicycle parking shelters in the future;
  • bus interchange: 14-stands with weather protection, seating and information facilities. Its flexible design could see buses dropping off passengers either internally to the bus station or externally next to commercial development to maximise the surrounding development potential. The interchange includes seven layover bays; and
  • vehicle access: dedicated passenger drop-off area and approximately 1,000 parking bays.

Read our Yanchep Station fact sheet (PDF) for more information. Take a 360 look of the Yanchep Station Entrance and the Yanchep Station Platform.

Station architecture 

Early investigations were conducted with METRONET’s Noongar Reference Group to identify important local landmarks such as the Banksia Menziesii and neighbouring Yanchep Caves which have influenced Yanchep Station’s architecture.

The Banksia Menziesii with its orange cone shaped flowers has been chosen to represent Yanchep Station as Banksia is typical of the area and portrays warmth (fire) and nurturing (nectar).

The Yanchep caves are a registered Aboriginal site with their own stories and mythology about their creation and importance to Noongar people.

Station Renders

Yanchep Station WEB

 *These images are artists impressions only and subject to change. 

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